Lois Webster Fund

The Lois Webster Fund

Supporting Colorado non-game wildlife research, education, and conservation

Loos Webster

It was always Lois’ dream to create this fund and, when in 1995—on her 75th birthday—her friends and family generously donated, the Lois Webster Fund (LWF) was started, giving life to her dream. 

To further its impact, each year the LWF relies on the contributions from generous donors to enable researchers to find answers to questions important for conservation; to engage learners of all ages in research; and to educate about Colorado non-game wildlife and helping provide information about techniques for restoring habitats and populations of our beloved Colorado non-game wildlife.

Over the past 25 years, the Lois Webster Fund (LWF) has awarded 53 grants totaling over $108,463 to non-profits, students, and teachers associated with universities, colleges, and schools, and local, state, and federal public land and natural resource agencies. Because grantees are required to partner with like organizations, the LWF grants have impacts far beyond their face value, as this Fact Sheet  helps explain. Apply for a grant or learn more about current and past projects (scroll down).

LOIS WEBSTER FUND ANNUAL CYCLE

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Our call for project proposals is now open. Please review our funding guidelines and application to prepare.

GUIDELINES AND APPLICATION

CURRENT PROJECTS

black swift

BLACK SWIFT MOVEMENT ECOLOGY

In this ongoing project, Rob Sparks, of Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, will gather additional fine-scale GPS data to document Black Swift movement ecology. The data from this project will shed light on the conservation needs of this “species of concern,” a status designated by the US and Canada.

BeeOnGlobeThistle

WILD BEE RECOVERY FOLLOWING A CATASTROPHIC FLOOD

In 2013, the St. Vrain Greenway in Longmont, CO experienced a 500-year flood that impacted many aspects of nature, including wild bee populations. Jessica Mullins, of University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, will study recovering bee populations with the goal of improving their resilience to future catastrophic events, which may become more frequent due to climate change.

Bald Eagle Mom and eaglet small by Carol Vogel

BALD EAGLE NESTING STUDIES

Dr. James Gammonley, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Fort Collins, will be leading a 4-year study of the behavior and demography of breeding Bald Eagles on Colorado’s northern Front Range.  Researchers will examine changes in land use around Bald Eagle nests over the past decade; breeding effort, breeding success and survival;  and home range and daily movements of breeding Bald Eagles nesting in sites with little disturbance, all the way to sites with high disturbance levels.  Another aspect of the study looks at survival, movements and space use of nonbreeding eagles in relation to man-made features.

PAST PROJECTS

Please review past projects dating back to 1998 and download the reports.

PROJECTS HISTORY AND REPORTS