Lois Webster Fund

The Lois Webster Fund

Supporting Colorado non-game wildlife research, education, and conservation

Loos Webster

It was always Lois’ dream to create this fund and, when in 1995—on her 75th birthday—her friends and family generously donated, the Lois Webster Fund (LWF) was started, giving life to her dream. 

To further its impact, each year the LWF relies on the contributions from generous donors to enable researchers to find answers to questions important for conservation; to engage learners of all ages in research; and to educate about Colorado non-game wildlife and helping provide information about techniques for restoring habitats and populations of our beloved Colorado non-game wildlife.

Over the past 26 years, the Lois Webster Fund (LWF) has awarded 57 grants totaling over $120,071 to non-profits, students and teachers associated with higher education and schools, as well as local, state, and federal public land and natural resource agencies. Because grantees are required to partner with like organizations, the LWF grants have impacts far beyond their face value. Apply for a grant or learn more about current and past projects.

SUPPORT RESEARCH

Give and help carry Lois Webster’s inspiration forward. We thank you (non-game wildlife does, too)!

DONATE TO THE FUND

2021 PROJECTS

topminnow konrad p schmidt

Colorado native plains topminnow and non-native mosquitofish competition

Investigating whether and how the CO native plains topminnow may co-exist with the invasive mosquitofish by experimentally testing inter-specific competition under different flow and temperature conditions in a laboratory setting.

Yoichiro Kanno, Colorado State University

Photo Credit: Konrad P Schmidt

Mountain_Plover_Bill_Bouton

Trophic interactions on Mountain Plover broods

Understanding the effects of trophic interactions on Mountain Plover brood habitat selection and survival in Pueblo and El Paso counties.

Casey Weissburg, Colorado State University.

Photo Credit: Bill Bouton

fire_David_O'Connor

Documenting avian community response to wildfire

Investigation of this issue by comparing pre- and post-fire audio recordings (bioacoustics) of areas of Rocky Mountain National Park impacted by the 2020 East Troublesome Fire.

Dr. Jacob Job, Colorado State University.

Photo Credit: David O’Connor

bat_Allyson L. Webb

Response of bats and associated nocturnal food webs to bark beetle kill

A bottom-up approach to quantify the effects of changes in vegetative structure on bat diversity and a top-down approach to quantify the effects of bat predation on insect populations.

Amanda Bevan, University of Northern Colorado.

Photo Credit: Allyson L. Webb

PAST PROJECTS & REPORTS

Please review past projects dating back to 1998 and download the reports.

PROJECTS HISTORY AND REPORTS

The call for 2022 project proposals will CLOSE January 31, 2022. Funding Guidelines are available below.

GUIDELINES

LOIS WEBSTER FUND TIMELINE